We are pleased that there is now widespread access to the vaccine in our community through area pharmacies and federal, state and local vaccination sites. We are no longer offering the COVID-19 vaccine for the community through Baptist Health, but you may make an appointment to receive your vaccine at myvaccine.fl.gov.

Why should you say yes to the COVID-19 Vaccine?

Why should you say yes to the COVID-19 Vaccine?

Vaccines are crucial to fighting deadly infectious diseases. While these vaccines are being developed as quickly as possible, routine processes and procedures remain in place to ensure the safety of any vaccine that is authorized or approved for use. COVID-19 vaccination is an important tool to help stop the pandemic.

COVID-19 Vaccine Frequently Asked Questions

Updated on August 13, 2021

About the COVID-19 Vaccine

  • No. Baptist Health is not offering COVID-19 vaccines or booster shots for our community.

    We are pleased that there is now widespread access to the vaccine in our community through area pharmacies and federal, state and local vaccination sites. You may find a convenient location to receive your vaccine (first or second dose) or your booster shot, if you qualify, at myvaccine.fl.gov.

  • Individuals who would like to receive a vaccine (primary vaccine series or booster) should visit myvaccine.fl.gov.

    Please see information by county below.

  • Because there is currently no cure for COVID-19, prevention is our best strategy. The development of COVID-19 vaccines is an important step in helping minimize the effects of this potentially deadly virus. Vaccines work by training your immune system to recognize and fight off the viruses and bacteria they target. By triggering an immune system response to a virus through a vaccine, your body is better equipped to destroy these disease-causing microbes in the future should you be exposed to COVID-19.

  • Yes. You should get the COVID-19 vaccine if you’ve had the virus. We do not currently have enough information to determine if, or for how long, someone is protected after infection (through natural immunity) from getting COVID-19 again. The vaccine is much more effective at preventing COVID-19 infection.

    Please note that if you’ve had COVID-19 monoclonal antibody therapy or COVID-19 convalescent plasma, you should not receive the COVID-19 vaccine until at least 90 days following treatment.

  • COVID-19 vaccination is recommended for all people aged 12 years and older, including people who are pregnant, breastfeeding, trying to get pregnant now, or might become pregnant in the future. Pregnant and recently pregnant people are more likely to get severely ill with COVID-19 compared with non-pregnant people. Getting a COVID-19 vaccine can protect you from severe illness from COVID-19. Read more on the CDC’s guidance on the COVID-19 vaccine while pregnant or breastfeeding here.

  • In Miami-Dade, Monroe and Broward Counties:

    Patients need to be evaluated by a medical provider at one of our Urgent Care Centers to determine if they are a candidate for monoclonal antibody therapy. If the provider at our Urgent Care Center recommends the treatment, we will coordinate the infusion.

    If you believe you may be a candidate to receive monoclonal antibody therapy, please visit one of our Baptist Health Urgent Care Centers for a medical evaluation.

    In Palm Beach County:

    Patients who are interested in receiving monoclonal antibody therapy in Palm Beach County or their referring physician may contact call the following numbers:

    • Boca Raton Regional Hospital - Call 561-235-4940
    • Bethesda Hospital East and Bethesda Hospital West - Call 561-737-7733 extension 83083.

  • CDC now recommends that people whose immune systems are compromised moderately to severely should receive an additional dose of mRNA COVID-19 vaccine after the initial 2 doses.

    Currently, CDC is recommending that moderately to severely immunocompromised people receive an additional dose. This includes people who have:

    • Been receiving active cancer treatment for tumors or cancers of the blood
    • Received an organ transplant and are taking medicine to suppress the immune system
    • Received a stem cell transplant within the last 2 years or are taking medicine to suppress the immune system
    • Moderate or severe primary immunodeficiency (such as DiGeorge syndrome, Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome)
    • Advanced or untreated HIV infection
    • Active treatment with high-dose corticosteroids or other drugs that may suppress your immune response

    People should talk to their healthcare provider about their medical condition, and whether getting an additional dose is appropriate for them.

    For more information from the CDC regarding COVID-19 boosters, click here.

    To find a vaccine near you, visit myvaccine.fl.org. You may also search vaccines.gov, text your ZIP code to 438829, or call 1-800-232-0233 to find locations near you.

  • The Pfizer vaccine requires two doses, administered 21 days apart.

    The Moderna vaccine requires two doses, administered 28 days apart.

    The Johnson & Johnson/Janssen vaccine is one dose.

    The CDC now recommends that people whose immune systems are compromised moderately to severely should receive an additional dose of mRNA COVID-19 vaccine after the initial 2 doses.

    Additionally, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) announced its plan to begin offering COVID-19 boosters to all eligible Americans beginning the week of September 20 and starting 8 months after an individual’s second dose.

  • No. You should complete the series of vaccines with the same product.

  • Let’s start with the similarities. Both the Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna vaccines are made of laboratory manifested agent called mRNA that causes the body to make a substance to which your body’s immune system responds; both vaccines require two doses for the highest immunity; and both vaccines have proven to be extremely safe and effective in trials.

    The main difference is that the Moderna vaccine requires 28 days between the two doses, while the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine requires 21 days between doses. In addition, the Moderna vaccine can be stored in normal freezers, unlike the Pfizer vaccine, making it more accessible outside of hospitals.

    For more information from the FDA on the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine, click here.

    For more information from the FDA on the Moderna vaccine, click here.

  • Yes. Although mask wearing and social distancing are important to limit exposure to COVID-19, the vaccine will help protect you from serious illness if you become infected. The combination of getting vaccinated and following guidelines, such as mask wearing and social distancing, offer the best protection for you and can help prevent spread to others.

  • Yes. No vaccine is 100 percent effective, and the CDC recommends that everyone continues using all the tools available to us to help stop this pandemic, such as covering your mouth and nose with a mask, washing hands often, staying at least six feet away from others, following CDC travel guidance, following quarantine guidance after an exposure to someone with COVID-19, and following any applicable workplace or school guidance. Together, COVID-19 vaccination and following CDC’s recommendations on how to protect yourself and others, offers the best protection from getting and spreading COVID-19.

    Experts need to understand more about the protection from being contagious that COVID-19 vaccines provide before deciding to change recommendations on steps everyone should take to slow the spread of the virus that causes COVID-19. We know it significantly reduces symptomatic and severe disease, but not whether it completely protects from infecting others. Other factors, including how many people get vaccinated and how the virus is spreading in communities, will also affect this decision.

  • If you aren’t feeling well, it is recommended that you wait until you’re feeling better to get the vaccine.

  • The COVID-19 vaccine does not take the place of any other vaccination. In our current environment, it is extremely important to do as much as possible to stay healthy, including getting the flu vaccine and any others recommended by your healthcare provider to prevent the spread of illness.

  • It is unknown at this time how long immunity will last; ongoing studies will help determine if repeat vaccination is needed, and if it is, how often we may need a booster. Therefore, after vaccination you will still need to wear a mask and social distance until further notice. Factors such as how many people get vaccinated and how the virus is spreading in communities will help determine when we may be able to stop taking these extra precautions.

  • Widespread vaccination is a critical tool to help stop the pandemic.

    Learn more about the COVID-19 vaccine here.

  • Side effects are a normal sign that your body is building protection. Some people may experience more symptoms with the COVID-19 vaccine compared to other vaccinations, such as the flu shot. The second or booster dose can produce symptoms more severe than experienced with the first dose. The most common side effect is muscle soreness or aching in the arm, which will resolve without treatment. Other common side effects after vaccination may include:

    • Swelling or redness where the vaccine was administered
    • Muscle and joint achiness elsewhere
    • Low-grade fever
    • Chills
    • Fatigue
    • Headache

    These side effects are expected and not serious. They will resolve with time. If you are experiencing symptoms more serious than those described, or fever continues for more than two days, contact your doctor or seek care at the nearest emergency department. Make sure you notify the vaccine administrator of these symptoms prior to your second vaccine shot.

  • No. None of the COVID-19 vaccines currently in development in the U.S., including the Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna COVID-19 vaccines, use the live virus that causes COVID-19. After receiving the vaccine, you may experience symptoms such as arm pain, low-grade fever, chills or fatigue. This is normal and symptoms will resolve without treatment.

  • During this public health emergency, the FDA has so far issued full approval for Pfizer’s two-dose COVID-19 vaccine, the first of the coronavirus vaccines to receive this type of approval. This vaccine was previously granted Emergency Use Authorization (EUA) to allow unapproved medical products or unapproved uses of approved medical products to be used in an emergency to diagnose, treat or prevent COVID-19 when there are not adequate, approved and available alternatives.

    This full approval for those aged 16 and older means Pfizer’s shot has undergone rigorous testing following at least six months of safety data, per the agency’s high standard process for reviewing the safety and effectiveness of medical products. Full approval is the strongest endorsement of safety and efficacy by the FDA.

    In addition to receiving full FDA approval, the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine continues to be available under EUA for individuals 12 through 15 years of age and for the administration of a third dose in certain immunocompromised individuals.

  • During this public health emergency, the FDA may issue an EUA to allow unapproved medical products or unapproved uses of approved medical products to be used in an emergency to diagnose, treat or prevent COVID-19 when there are not adequate, approved and available alternatives.

    This product has not been approved or licensed by FDA, but has been authorized for emergency use by FDA, under an EUA to prevent coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) for use in individuals 18 years of age and older. The emergency use of this product is only authorized for the duration of the declaration that circumstances exist justifying the authorization of emergency use of the medical product under Section 564(b)(1) of the FD&C Act unless the declaration is terminated or authorization revoked sooner.

    In determining whether to issue an EUA for a product, the FDA evaluates the available evidence and assesses any known or potential risks and any known or potential benefits, and if the benefit-risk assessment is favorable, the product is made available during the emergency.

    The EUA requires that fact sheets that provide important information, including dosing instructions and information about the benefits and risks for the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine and the Moderna COVID-19 vaccine, be made available to vaccine providers and recipients.

    The Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 has been approved by the FDA in individuals 16 and older. Use for indivuduals between the ages are 12-15 continues to be available under emergency use authorization.

    Those documents for the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine are as follows:

    These documents for the Moderna COVID-19 vaccine are as follows:

 

Say Yes to winning together. Say Yes to the COVID-19 vaccine.

When we work together, we can defeat our opponent. The healthcare heroes at Baptist Health have been doing their part to defeat Covid-19 by saying Yes to the vaccine. Along with the Miami HEAT and Inter Miami CF, they encourage you to do the same. Let’s join forces as a team and help bring an end to this pandemic.

Miami Heat Say Yes to the Vaccine
say yes covid video
Miami FC player.

"Yes to trusting science and not being afraid."

Katie Acquino, D.O., Medical Director

“Yes to beating this pandemic."

Julián Carranza, Inter Miami CF Forward

"Yes to being able to hug my kids."

Duxson Michel, R.N., Patient Care Supervisor

"Yes to stopping the devastation that Covid-19 causes."

Yvonne Johnson, M.D., Chief Medical Officer
Federico Higuain

"Yes, so we can healp each other."

Federico Higuain, Inter Miami CF Midfielder

"Yes to protecting my patients."

Christine Cummings, R.N.

“Yes to setting an example for my team."

Larissa Vega, R.N.

"Yes to screaming 'goal' together."

Nicolás Figal, Inter Miami CF Defender

"Yes because it’s the best way for us to move forward."

Michael Swartzon, M.D., Primary Care Sports Medicine Physician