Each year at this time, public health officials and healthcare providers remind parents to make sure their children’s immunizations are up to date before school starts. Even though COVID-19 has turned our lives upside down this year, the need to vaccinate kids and teens has not changed. In fact, it’s more important than ever.

Host Dr. Jonathan Fialkow examines why now is not the time to let your family’s immunizations slide with guests; Deepa Sharma, D.O., a family medicine physician with Baptist Health; and Lillian Rivera, RN, MSN, Ph.D, consultant to the Florida Department of Health on COVID-19 response.

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Book an appointment

Now more than ever, it’s important to establish a relationship with a primary care doctor – someone who will get to know you and your healthcare needs. Baptist Health Primary Care providers can help guide and manage your overall health and wellness, both in-person and through virtual visits. Our doctors and advanced practitioners aid in the early detection of disease and long-term health problems, help address any worrisome symptoms, manage chronic conditions, prescribe medications and advise on achieving overall health goals. Should you require specialized care, we provide access to Baptist Health’s comprehensive network of expert physicians and resources, keeping your health at the heart of what we do.

For appointments, physician referrals, or second opinions please call us at 786-596-2464. International patients, please call 786-596-2373.

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